Q

How can I be a Barnard student and compete on Columbia NCAA Division I teams?

A

A special partnership between Barnard College and Columbia University makes it possible for students enrolled at Barnard to compete alongside Columbia students on 16 NCAA Division I teams. This arrangement, known as the Columbia-Barnard Athletic Consortium, offers an unparalleled opportunity to enjoy all the benefits of being a student in a small, liberal arts setting where the success of women is the focus—while being part of the NCAA Division I and the Ivy League Conference.

Q

I’m interested in applying to Barnard and competing as a Division I athlete. What do I need to do?

A

• Read the NCAA’s Guide for College-Bound Student-Athletes, as well as the Ivy League admissions and financial aid policies.

• Be sure that you’ve registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center at eligibilitycenter.org. (You can register during your sophomore year.) You must be certified by the Eligibility Center in order to play Division I sports.

• Download and complete the Prospective Student-Athlete Questionnaire any time early in your high school athletic experience. You may also provide an athletic résumé with your personal and academic information, relevant statistics, athletic profile, news clippings and/or athletic video, coaches’ recommendations, video links, and a cover letter. If coaches are interested in recruiting you, they may ask you for a transcript, school profile, and a record of all testing completed. Note that under NCAA guidelines, there are times during the recruiting cycle that coaches may be limited in their ability to communicate with prospective athletes.

• After August 1 of your senior year, begin the application process to Barnard. Find out more about Admissions.

Q

Barnard and Columbia students compete on the same NCAA Division I teams. What’s the difference between being a Barnard student and a Columbia student?

A

In terms of basic facts, Barnard is smaller, with more than 2,500 students on a four-acre campus. Columbia has a total of nearly 30,000 students on a 32-acre campus. Barnard is an all-women’s institution, while Columbia is co-ed. Both Barnard and Columbia are liberal arts institutions, but they have different approaches. Columbia has a shared Core Curriculum to guide course selection. Barnard uses Foundations, a progressing set of requirements which provides flexibility and exposure to a wide range of subjects through Distribution Requirements and the Six Modes of Thinking (designed to help students think locally, globally, about social differentce, with historical perspective, quantitatively and empirically, technolocally and digitally). Through Barnard’s partnership with Columbia, Barnard students can take classes, access resources such as libraries, and join student organizations open to all students at Columbia.

If you see yourself in a smaller liberal arts college setting where faculty and staff members know you and are committed to your success as a student, an athlete, a leader, and a woman, but you don’t want to give up the opportunity to compete in Division I athletics, consider Barnard.

Q

Are there athletic scholarships?

A

The universities in the Ivy League, including Columbia/Barnard, do not award scholarships based on athletic ability. At Barnard, financial aid is based on need. Find out more about financial aid at Barnard.

Q

When I graduate from Barnard, do I also graduate from Columbia?

A

Your Barnard diploma will include the signatures of both the president of Barnard College and the president of Columbia University, as well as the seals of both institutions. Barnard students are individually recognized at a College commencement ceremony and degrees are conferred to all schools and colleges at the University commencement ceremony.

Q

What’s the difference between an “unofficial visit” and an “official visit”?

A

Under NCAA Division I guidelines, you may visit Columbia/Barnard—at your own expense—anytime before or during your senior year. That’s known as an “unofficial visit.” An official visit, on the other hand, is financed in whole or part by Barnard/Columbia. An official visit cannot be longer than 48 hours. You can make up to five official paid visits to college campuses.

Q

What is the Ivy League Conference?

A

Barnard as part of Columbia University is a member of the Ivy League Athletic Conference, which also includes Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Yale. The Ivy League annually finishes among the top Division I athletic conferences in national competitive rankings, and Ivy League student-athletes earn the country’s best records in the NCAA Academic Performance Ratings.

Q

How did the Columbia-Barnard Athletic Consortium come about?

A

Before 1983, Barnard had its own established athletics program for women, and Columbia University was an all-male institution. When women were admitted to Columbia University in 1983, the consortium was formed. The goal remains to provide all undergraduate women at Columbia and Barnard the finest competitive opportunities within the Ivy League. By combining forces, Barnard and Columbia are able to offer a stronger athletic program than what either could offer individually.

Athletic facilities

Students use facilities on both the Barnard and Columbia campuses, including Dodge, Levien, and LeFrak gyms, along with outdoor facilities at Baker Field, a 26-acre complex at the northern tip of Manhattan. Highlights include three multi-sport gyms, two indoor pools, a boathouse, a soccer stadium, a softball field, and a field hockey venue.

Barnard athletes regularly earn honors, including All-Ivy League, Academic All-Ivy League, All-Region, All-American, National Academic Team, Ivy League Player of the Year, and more. They’ve gone on to compete in world championships and the Olympics.

Barnard students compete in 30 club sports including ice hockey, rock climbing, kayaking, triathlon, capoeira, and ballroom dance. The intramural sports program offers even more ways to test your physical limits—or to just have fun.

Intramural sports

If you were involved in athletics in high school but you’re not interested in Division I-level competition, you might consider joining an intramural team at Barnard or Columbia. Women’s or co-ed teams have included basketball, indoor soccer, lacrosse, and dodgeball.

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Barnard is the only college for women and one of the only small liberal arts college to offer Division I athletics.
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More than 4 out of 5 executive businesswomen played sports growing up, and the vast majority say lessons learned on the playing field contributed to their success in business.

“I was very involved with sports in high school and definitely wanted to continue that here. Intramural soccer was great because it didn’t need too much time commitment, allowing me to really have fun with it. Did I mention we were champions? It was awesome.”

Talia Cuddeback, sophomore from San Francisco, California; undecided